Reviewed! The Rolling Stones - "Ladies and Gentlemen: The Rolling Stones"

The Rolling Stones

"Ladies and Gentlemen: The Rolling Stones"
Eagle Rock Ent.

"Ladies and Gentlemen: The Rolling Stones" had been a lost artifact in the annals of Rolling Stones lore for decades, until now that is, as the concert DVD release, which once was shown on the big screen in theatres nationwide, has been released for all to see, in all of its remastered glory.

Filmed over 4 nights in Texas during the 'Exile on Main St' tour in 1972, "Ladies and Gentlemen: The Rolling Stones" is more than just tunes from the legendary "Exile" disc, as the band ventures into material off of other record like "Sticky Fingers," "Let it Bleed," and "Beggars Banquet" for material for the release, and the overall product is leaps and bounds better for it. As it might be expected, some of the footage here is pretty raw and dark, though it doesn’t get too much in the way of the Stones on-stage electricity. 'Brown Sugar' opens "Ladies and Gentlemen: The Rolling Stones" in stellar fashion, and 'Gimme Shelter' adds a flair of enthusiasm to things early on, before viewers are treated to a rare performance of the oft-forgotten 'Dead Flowers.' 'Happy' and 'Tumbling Dance' move things along, before 'Live in Vain' and 'Sweet Virginia' slow the pace a bit. 'Jumpin' Jack Flash' and 'Street Fighting Man' team up to cap off "Ladies and Gentlemen: The Rolling Stones" in perfect fashion, as one who previously has heard either of these tracks before would expect.

The extras portion of "Ladies and Gentlemen: The Rolling Stones" opens with a rehearsal set, which includes performances of 'Shake Your Hips,' 'Tumbling Dice' and 'Blueberry Jam,' then moves to a quick 5-minute archival interview with Jagger, and a 10-minute brand-new interview with the singer/songwriter. The latter of the two is the better one, just FYI.

There might be better Rolling Stones DVD releases than "Ladies and Gentlemen: The Rolling Stones," (see the Martin Scorsese vehicle Rolling Stones: Shine a Light") but the fact remains, this one is still worth seeing, and definitely not without its charms.

Grade: B

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